Green Day’s Father of All…What, Exactly?

by Jared Moser

Dropped on February 7th, Father of All… is Green Day’s thirteenth studio album. Originating in California, the world-famous pop-punk band follows their 2016 album, Revolution Radio, which hit number one on the Billboard Hot 200, with this ten song record.

While seemingly lacking musical direction with their ¡Uno!, ¡Dos!, and ¡Tré! albums in 2012, Green Day got back on track with a pretty solid album in 2016, carried by hit tracks such as “Bang Bang,” “Revolution Radio,” and “Still Breathing.” Fast forward four years, and Green day has given us Father of All…. Unfortunately, I don’t even know what this is.

With ten songs, the album somehow only clocks in at a little over 26 minutes. The album kicks off with a track that gives off a false sense of hope for the album. “Father of All…” is a powerful and fun way to introduce the album with quick and creative drums, and distant alternative indie rock vocals. It’s a pretty average Green Day song, though; by no means should it be the best song on any album. To put it lightly, the fun stops there.

The rest of the record is boring, repetitive, and lacks creativity. The only standouts are “Oh Yeah!,” “Stab You In The Heart,” and “Junkies on a High.” Honestly, I wouldn’t even go back to listen to these; they’re so mediocre that they stand out against the rest of the bland nothingness of the rest of the album. Billy Joel Armstrong’s vocal patterns are repetitive and boring, Mike Dirnt’s bass is non-existent, and Tré Cool’s drums are the same spiritless beat every song. The album has no message, no drive, and saddest of all, no Green Day flare that we know and love.

To make matters even worse, the record ends with the worst song on the album. “Graffitia” has the same unoriginal guitar riffs, and same beginner drum beat the entire song. The only reason it’s worse than the previous song on the record, “Take the Money and Crawl,” is because it’s a minute and nine seconds longer.

I do have to keep in mind, though, that if I was listening to this album and it was made by a no-name band, it actually wouldn’t be that bad. But, to know that this album was made by Green Day, a band with an absolute beast of a discography, world-wide respect, and a previous record that was really enjoyable, is just saddening. I hold Green Day to such a high standard that when they put out something this mediocre, it’s going to seem so much worse than it might actually be.

Father of All… sounds like everything that people disliked about punk bands in the 90s that Green Day didn’t do. The only rewarding characteristics I can get from listening to this are the experimental flare that “Father of All…” and “Junkies on High” bring to the album, which I appreciate. I’m giving Father of All… a 3/10, and I hope Green Day can come out with something more worth listening to in the future.